Monthly Archives: February 2016


Announcements for February 28th

CANE

BEYOND CANE

  • Fabulous offerings from ASCANIUS Youth Classics Institute, including opportunities to volunteer.
  • Registration for SALVI’s Rusticationes Tirorum, Veteranorum, and their Pedagogy Seminar is now open for July 2016.  For more information, or to find out how to apply for the Amy High Fellowship, point your browser at Latin.org.
  • The Boston Area Classics Calendar has a lot going on, and a weekly email digest of upcoming events.
  • If you live in the western Massachusetts, northern Connecticut, or southern Vermont area you may be interested in Amherst College’s list of upcoming and past lectures in the Pioneer Valley.
  • The Massachusetts Foreign Language Association (MaFLA) is looking for applicants for it’s Elaine G. Batting Scholarship.
  • National Latin Teacher Recruitment Week is fast approaching.   We need more teachers ready to take up the charge, as we know from the article which Ronnie Ancona and Kathleen Durkin wrote for Amphorahttps://classicalstudies.org/amphora/there-shortage-certified-latin-teachers-please-spread-word-0.  NLTRW traditionally is the first week in March, but you can take any day or week to talk to your students about becoming a Latin teacher.  There are many resources to be found here, http://www.promotelatin.org/nltrw, including a mini-grant application.  Grants of up to $200 can be requested every other year by a program and can be put toward receptions, speakers, giveaways, and more.  It would be especially wonderful to see more K-12 teachers taking advantage of the funding opportunities available.
  • The Society for Classical Studies has some fellowships, awards, and grants with a deadline of March 4th. Check out the Pedagogy Awards and the Zeph Stewart Latin Teacher Training Awards.
  • The John C. Rouman Classical Lecture at UNH will be held on Wednesday, March 9 at 7:30 pm.  Professor Leonora Neville will be lecturing on “Breaking All the Rules:  A Princess Writes History in Constantinople.”  The lecture will be held in DeMeritt Hall, room 240 on the UNH Durham campus. Free and open to the public.  Download a PDF flyer here.
  • The Rose-Marie Lewent Conference at NYU’s Center for Ancient Studies is Thursday and Friday, March 31-April 1, entitled “New Yorkers in the Land of the Pharaohs: Fieldwork in Egypt by New York Institutions” is free and open to the public.  View the full program here, or download a PDF flyer for this event.

Professional Development

  • In the summer of 2016 (July 18-August 5), there will be an NEH Summer Seminar for pre-collegiate teachers on the topic of Roman Daily Life. Two spots are also reserved for full-time graduate students who intend to become pre-collegiate teachers. This seminar is an opportunity to read Petronius and some graffiti in Latin and look at Pompeian archaeology for various topics of Roman daily life. The Petronius reading in particular forms a central core of the seminar, and thus an intermediate level of Latin proficiency (1 year of college level Latin) is required. The seminar will be held in St. Peter, Minnesota (1 hour from Minneapolis) on the campus of Gustavus Adolphus College. The NEH pays each person $2700 to participate, which will more than cover the living and food expenses (approximately $1500). The seminar has been organized by Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus College) and will be co-taught by him, Beth Severy-Hoven (Macalester), Jeremy Hartnett (Wabash), and Rebecca Benefiel (Washington and Lee). The application deadline is March 1. More information on the seminar and directions on applying can be found at the website (https://gustavus.edu/events/romandailylife/).  If you have any questions, please write the director of the seminar at panciera@gustavus.edu.

Meetups

  • Live in western MA or northern CT and want to practice speaking in Latin? There is a large group that meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Hadley, MA! For details, contact TJ Howell.
  • In the Boston area? Check out the Active Latin Meetup page for events.

CANE Inspires Teacher of Greek Mythology

After my first year of teaching English I was asked to teach a 9th grade course in Greek mythology the following year.  I had never formally studied mythology and found I knew little about it.  So, I sat down that summer and spent about four hours a day studying what became the greatest love of my teaching career, teaching Greek mythology.  While teaching this course, I had learned about CANE and attended Annual Meetings as well as the Summer Institute, then held at Dartmouth.  I acquired many new ideas and my students readily captured my enthusiasm from these CANE-inspired lessons.  My methodology grew from there: Wherever I sought to learn, my own processes of mastery led me to design creative tasks for student experiences of Greek Mythology, though I had never studied Latin or Greek.
In order to understand all the complex relationships between gods and goddesses, I made a genealogy chart for myself which I used in the classroom.  This later became the first project that I would assign to my students. Since I had needed to learn related geography of Greece and the Mediterranean, my second student project involved making maps of the ancient world. Level I students had a simpler blank map with dots for the cities and ‘carrots’ for mountain ranges that they were required to label correctly. I required the Honors students to draw and label a map in fuller detail, showing topography.
We had great fun in this course while students met their English language competencies. On ‘Dress-up-to-tell-a-story Day’ students wore their version of Greek attire and took on the persona of Greek god or goddess and told their character’s story. They could work in groups to act out various myths if they preferred.  I checked off my students’ public speaking requirement.  At that time 9th grade students were required to write ‘compare and contrast’ papers.  My students compared a Greek creation story with one from another culture and then analyzed their similarities and differences. A more challenging version of this was during a unit of study of ‘The Quest.’  Students analyzed the film Ladyhawke by identifying features of a quest also found within with the story Jason and the Golden Fleece.
During the week of midterm exams we read Euripides’ Medea in class without additional assignments or homework. We utilized a basic Socratic questioning technique during the reading in which each student asked a question of someone else, who answered it and then asked a question of their own of another student.  Their questioning was very spontaneous, but they took this very seriously with great results, while I simply watched in amazement and told them how proud I was of them.
Students learned the Greek alphabet while studying Oedipus Rex and had to guess the riddle of the Sphinx. One day I would wear a T-shirt I purchased at CANE with the riddle on the back in Greek. Each student had a paper copy of the mysterious writing on my shirt that they had to transliterate and try to decipher. I told them the one Greek work I knew which was kai that meant “and.” Students eventually saw the prefixes for one, two and four and got the idea that it was the riddle, while others started at the end and saw the answer, “anthropos.”
Another exciting moment for all!  The story of Damon and Pythias inspired a newspaper project in which students designed a front page complete with scandalous headlines for individual news articles, which featured the same story from the different viewpoints of Dionysius, Damon, Pythias, Pythias’s family, and the townspeople. All my classes enjoyed reading the papers posted with humorous points of view and artistic representations of scenes from the myth.
Gwyn Baldwin taught Greek Mythology in her high school English courses for 31 years: 10 in Illinois and 21 in Wilton, New Hampshire. She regularly attended CANE Annual Meetings and the Summer Institute.


Announcements for February 22

CANE

BEYOND CANE

  • Fabulous offerings from ASCANIUS Youth Classics Institute, including opportunities to volunteer.
  • Registration for SALVI’s Rusticationes Tirorum, Veteranorum, and their Pedagogy Seminar is now open for July 2016.  For more information, or to find out how to apply for the Amy High Fellowship, point your browser at Latin.org.
  • The Boston Area Classics Calendar has a lot going on, and a weekly email digest of upcoming events.
  • If you live in the western Massachusetts, northern Connecticut, or southern Vermont area you may be interested in Amherst College’s list of upcoming and past lectures in the Pioneer Valley.
  • The Massachusetts Foreign Language Association (MaFLA) is looking for applicants for it’s Elaine G. Batting Scholarship.
  • National Latin Teacher Recruitment Week is fast approaching.   We need more teachers ready to take up the charge, as we know from the article which Ronnie Ancona and Kathleen Durkin wrote for Amphorahttps://classicalstudies.org/amphora/there-shortage-certified-latin-teachers-please-spread-word-0.  NLTRW traditionally is the first week in March, but you can take any day or week to talk to your students about becoming a Latin teacher.  There are many resources to be found here, http://www.promotelatin.org/nltrw, including a mini-grant application.  Grants of up to $200 can be requested every other year by a program and can be put toward receptions, speakers, giveaways, and more.  It would be especially wonderful to see more K-12 teachers taking advantage of the funding opportunities available.
  • The Society for Classical Studies has some fellowships, awards, and grants with upcoming deadlines, which range from February 19th through March 4th. Check out the David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship, the Pedagogy Awards, and the Zeph Stewart Latin Teacher Training Awards.
  • The John C. Rouman Classical Lecture at UNH will be held on Wednesday, March 9 at 7:30 pm.  Professor Leonora Neville will be lecturing on “Breaking All the Rules:  A Princess Writes History in Constantinople.”  The lecture will be held in DeMeritt Hall, room 240 on the UNH Durham campus. Free and open to the public.  Download a PDF flyer here.
  • The Rose-Marie Lewent Conference at NYU’s Center for Ancient Studies is Thursday and Friday, March 31-April 1, entitled “New Yorkers in the Land of the Pharaohs: Fieldwork in Egypt by New York Institutions” is free and open to the public.  View the full program here, or download a PDF flyer for this event.

Professional Development

  • In the summer of 2016 (July 18-August 5), there will be an NEH Summer Seminar for pre-collegiate teachers on the topic of Roman Daily Life. Two spots are also reserved for full-time graduate students who intend to become pre-collegiate teachers. This seminar is an opportunity to read Petronius and some graffiti in Latin and look at Pompeian archaeology for various topics of Roman daily life. The Petronius reading in particular forms a central core of the seminar, and thus an intermediate level of Latin proficiency (1 year of college level Latin) is required. The seminar will be held in St. Peter, Minnesota (1 hour from Minneapolis) on the campus of Gustavus Adolphus College. The NEH pays each person $2700 to participate, which will more than cover the living and food expenses (approximately $1500). The seminar has been organized by Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus College) and will be co-taught by him, Beth Severy-Hoven (Macalester), Jeremy Hartnett (Wabash), and Rebecca Benefiel (Washington and Lee). The application deadline is March 1. More information on the seminar and directions on applying can be found at the website (https://gustavus.edu/events/romandailylife/).  If you have any questions, please write the director of the seminar at panciera@gustavus.edu.

Meetups

  • Live in western MA or northern CT and want to practice speaking in Latin? There is a large group that meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Hadley, MA! For details, contact TJ Howell.
  • In the Boston area? Check out the Active Latin Meetup page for events.

Jobs