funding


CANE Funds Classics in New England! 1

Today’s post is a guest post by Katy Reddick. ¬†

The Classical Association of New England provides funding for classicists at a variety of academic levels from secondary school to post baccalaureate.  Extraordinary experiences are just that Рexperiences outside of the ordinary and CANE is proud to help bring a variety of classical adventures to fruition.

Secondary students are invited to apply for the Thomas and Eleanor Means Fund which provide up to three hundred dollars to support a student traveling to classical sites.  The trip needs to be with a class or recognized institution for educational rather than recreational purposes.  Some students work very hard to raise funds for such a trip and are then left without funds for gelato, fried artichokes or the souveneirs that keep our travels so alive.

Undergraduates are eligible for the Alison Barker Travel Scholarship.  This award provides approximately five hundred dollars for students who are traveling to classical sites in order to expand their understanding of the ancient world.  Travel must be sponsored by a college, university, or classical organization.  Students attending the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome and the American School of Athens are urged to apply.

Potential or current classics teachers working towards certification in Latin or Greek in the New England area are urged to apply for the Certification Scholarship.  This award is available to undergraduates applying to graduate programs or professionals who are taking courses towards certification.  Part time, full time and summer programs all qualify.

Teachers and students of classics in New England, who wish to study in Italy or Greece, can apply for the Renata Poggioli Award. The Poggioli Award, which is only offered in even numbered years, is restricted to those who have a rank of no higher than assistant professor or who have been teaching for less than ten years at the secondary level.  This award of approximately four to six thousand dollars is not restricted to CANE members.

CANE members who are planning to study at the American Academy in Rome summer session can apply for the Cornelia C. Coulter Scholarship.  Named for a former CANE president, the Coulter scholarship provides approximately five thousand dollars toward student at the Academy.  The Academy provides rigorous site based exploration of the city which is invaluable to any classicist.

CANE members who wish to study at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens or another recognized program other than the American Academy in Rome may apply for the Endowment Scholarship.  The Endowment Scholarship provides approximately six thousand dollars for travel.  Recent recipients have used the award to travel to Turkey and Italy with the Vergilian Society.

Please help CANE to create extraordinary experiences for classicists across New England.  Tell others, especially students, about these funding opportunities.  Better yet, begin planning your own classical adventure!

More information and application forms available at caneweb.org.


Links for the Week of 20 January

The deadline to apply for the American Academy in Rome Classical Summer School has been extended to 31 January and there are still funding opportunities available for secondary teachers: http://aarome.org/apply/summer-programs-0
Only a few spaces remain in the free CAM workshop on Speaking, Writing, Reading, and Teaching Latin on 9 February: http://www.massclass.org/index.php/archives/309
Finds from the drains of Roman bath houses tell us what people wore and what they did there: http://www.livescience.com/26202-drain-lost-items-roman-baths.html (via @Nihil_Novi_Net)
A portrait of a Roman man buried in Roman Britain has been produced using Roman artistic conventions: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-21009520 (via @DHSBClassics)
A collection of bibliographies on Roman topics: http://cnx.org/content/col11220/latest/ (via @apaclassics and @iota_subscript)
An argument for teaching Latin: http://comingofageinthemiddle.blogspot.ca/2012/12/verbatim.html (via @quinnkl and @rogueclassicist)
Treasure that was buried to save it from invading Romans has been found: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/2-000-old-treasure-discovered-black-sea-fortress-151425299.html (via @quinnkl)
Comparison of the walls of Rome: http://nolli.uoregon.edu/wallsOfRome.html (via @SarahEBond)
Amazing interactive timeline of Greek and Roman history and literature: http://learninglatin.altervista.org/chrono/chronology.html?l=eng (via @rogueclassicist)